What we solve

What kinds of product problems do we solve? We solve problems like these (and many more):

  • Product backlog is too long
  • Quality issues, production issues, fire fighting
  • Impact and relevance is small
  • Product lacks “secret sauce”
  • Features missing the mark with customers
  • Product has ill-defined purpose – unsure of what job it does
  • Product sales cycles too long, labour intensive
  • Ineffectual channels to market
  • Competition is winning, customers are defecting
  • User experience cohesion is poor
  • Product fails to make users awesome or give them super powers
  • Dated user interface design
  • On boarding and engagement failures – users give up
  • Product is difficult to use or presents users with convoluted workflows
  • Operating cost per customer too high
  • High total cost of product ownership
  • Low user enthusiasm and word of mouth recommendation
  • “Me too” product, with no product advantages, low margins
  • Need tactical wins without sacrificing long term viability
  • Not sure what the minimum lovable product would be
  • User interface clutter and complexity
  • Obsolete technology stack, impacting cost, reliability and agility
  • Nobody knows the product’s benefits – analysts unimpressed
  • Not sure who the product is for – poorly understood user personas
  • No product strategy – where to next?
  • No or low innovation flow
  • Technical debt lengthening development cycles, storing up problems, stalling progress
  • Slow release cadence, low customer feedback and validation
  • Too much work in progress
  • Not sure it’s secure
  • Sub-optimal business model, impacting cash flows
  • Poor customer experience when interacting with your organisation
  • Over-dependence on a few rock star staff members
  • Product can’t scale to meet demand
  • Feature bloat and interface clutter
  • Product lifecycle needs managing, end of life products to retire and replace
  • Low developer morale or culture issues, low psychological safety
  • Poor product sense or understanding of feature motivation and context
  • Haphazard new product introductions, missed opportunities to impress customers
  • No product vision for the future
  • Low return on incremental feature development
  • Need to turn a product into a platform
  • Limited ecosystem partnerships
  • Purpose and meaning in the work are missing
  • Destructive executive interference